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Case Study: CBD & THC for Pain

Updated: Dec 7, 2022

Welcome to Cannabis Conclusions, a unique educational series from Higher Learning LV that is targeted at hemp and cannabis industry professionals. This series provides readers with the conclusion section from important modern peer-reviewed research studies.


A 2022 study entitled "Integration of Cannabis Extract Tetrahydrocannabinol:Cannabidiol in an Interdisciplinary Therapy Setting: A Case of Chronic Multilocular Pain Disorder" that was published in the journal Medical Cannabis and Cannabinoids explored the potential efficacy of a cannabis extract containing the cannabinoids cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

The scientific investigation, designed as a case study, involved a "63-year-old female patient [who] was admitted to inpatient pain therapy with multilocular chronic acute exacerbated pain syndrome." The study's authors reported that the subject suffered a pain diagnosis involving "cervicobrachial syndrome, headache, fibromyalgia, and degenerative lumbar spine syndrome," as well as "polyarthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, and osteoarthritis."


The study reported that "many patients with chronic pain are prescribed opiates," but that such drugs "often do not bring the desired effect or are associated with unfavorable side effects." The scientists noted that pain patients increasingly are "looking for alternative treatment options," including the application of cannabinoids for relief.


"Medical cannabis refers to the use of cannabis or cannabinoids as a medical therapy to treat serious medical conditions and/or relieve symptoms," reported the study's authors. They noted that cannabinoids under investigation include CBD, THC, cannabinol (CBN), and cannabichromene (CBC).


Study Conclusions

"In the present case study, the phytocannabinoids Δ9-THC and CBD were administered as a full-spectrum extract 10:10 mg (10:10 LGP Classic, little green pharma). The administration of oral THC:CBD cannabis extract for the prevention of nausea and vomiting caused by refractory chemotherapy was investigated in a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled phase II/III study.

"A significant improvement in the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting was observed. Studies also show that the dose of opiates could be reduced by the administration of medicinal cannabis. In this case study, after the administration of the cannabis extract, the administration of metamizole (nonopioid analgesic) could be discontinued during therapy.


"A significant improvement in the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting was observed. Studies also show that the dose of opiates could be reduced by the administration of medicinal cannabis."

"In preclinical studies, full-spectrum cannabis extract shows anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects in addition to pain-relieving effects. Despite stopping the analgesic, the pain intensity VAS 8/10 (time of admission to the hospital) was reduced to the level of VAS 4/10 at discharge. The quality of sleep also improved over time. The mental state at the time of admission to the hospital was poor, but continuously improved until the end of the stay. This may be due to the antidepressant effect of CBD.


"The only side effects the patient reported on day 4 (start of cannabis therapy) and day 19 (requestioning) were dry mouth. This is one of the most common side effects, along with dizziness, drowsiness, and weakness. Initially, the blood pressure values fluctuated, especially the systolic value, but over time the blood pressure values were in the normal range, while the diastolic value was rather low.

"No interactions with the other drugs due to the administration of the cannabis extract could be determined. It must also be considered that the cannabis product chemotypes offered are constantly evolving (e.g., CBD-dominant, THC-dominant, and so on).


"More research is needed into the effectiveness and interaction of cannabis with other medications in chronic pain patients."

"Therefore, it is necessary for physicians to carefully consider the Δ9-THC and/or CBD content of the products. THC can impair cognitive function and should not be given to people with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction. More research is needed into the effectiveness and interaction of cannabis with other medications in chronic pain patients. It is also important to involve the patient in the therapy decision and to measure patient-related outcomes."


View the original study.


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