top of page

CBC, CBG, CBGA, and THCV for Skin Disease

Welcome to Cannabis Conclusions, a unique educational series from Higher Learning LV that is targeted at hemp and cannabis industry professionals. This series provides readers with the conclusion section from important modern peer-reviewed research studies.


A May 2022 study entitled "Effects of Rare Phytocannabinoids on the Endocannabinoid System of Human Keratinocytes" that was published in the journal Molecular Sciences "systematically investigated the possible effects of four rare [cannabinoids]: CBG, CBC, THCV, and CBGA."

Reported the study: "Cannabis (Cannabis sativa) is a weed that is native to Central and South Asia. It contains more than 500 bioactive components, specifically phytocannabinoids (pCBs) but also polyphenols, flavonoids, terpenes, terpenoids and fatty acids. The recreational and medicinal properties of cannabis extracts have been known for centuries and today, these extracts are consumed by more than four percent of the global population."


"Our results demonstrated that CBG, CBC, THCV, and CBGA modulate the gene and protein expression of distinct ECS elements differently."

Study Conclusions

"In conclusion, our results demonstrated that CBG, CBC, THCV, and CBGA modulate the gene and protein expression of distinct ECS elements differently, as well as their functional activity and their content of eCBs (anandamide and 2-AG) and PEA.


"Notably, all cannabinoids increased CB1/2 binding, TRPV1 channel simulation, and FAAH and MAGL activity, which is an observation that represents a proof of concept that they are indeed endowed with biological activity in human keratinocytes via ECS modulation.

"On this basis, preclinical studies and clinical trials (at least those that are related to skin disorders) should take into account the potential contribution of rare cannabinoids to the fine-tuning of eCB signaling and biological activity during treatment with cannabis extracts.


"These unprecedented observations should be considered when exploring the therapeutic potential of cannabis extracts for the treatment of human skin diseases."

"Of course, these rare cannabinoids could be used in their pure form as therapeutic drugs, provided that a careful biochemical profiling of their targets and potential off-targets outside the ECS is preliminarily performed. Only then can their therapeutic potential be exploited by ruling out the harmful effects that are often observed cannabis extracts are used as recreational drugs.


"These unprecedented observations should be considered when exploring the therapeutic potential of cannabis extracts for the treatment of human skin diseases."


View the original study.


🎧 Like what you just read? Listen and learn with our highly educational weekly Cannabis Commerce + Chemistry Podcast. At under 30 minutes per episode, it helps industry professionals stay current on trending topics.

63 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All
bottom of page