Study Summary: Safety & Efficacy of Cannabis for Dogs

Updated: Oct 9

Welcome to Higher Learning LV's Study Summary series. This series reviews and summarizes peer-reviewed research studies and was developed specifically for cannabis industry professionals. These study summaries provide easily digested quick reads for a variety of important issues regarding the commerce and chemistry of legal cannabis.

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A 2022 study entitled "Safety and Efficacy of the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis-Based Products in the Treatment of Dogs: An Integrative Review" that was published in the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research investigated "cannabis-based products for therapeutic purposes...in the field of animal health."


The Study

The study noted that cannabis, while considered by many researchers and scientists to be safe "when appropriately used by human patients," can pose a risk to domesticated pets such as dogs, particularly depending on consumption avenue. The study explored "aspects of the safety and efficacy of different cannabis-based products in dogs' treatment."


The study explored "aspects of the safety and efficacy of different cannabis-based products in dogs' treatment."

The research was designed in the form of a literature review, meaning that the scientists analyzed and looked for patterns within previous studies conducted over a 31-year period between 1990 and 2021. Nineteen prior studies met the scientists' inclusion criteria and were reflected in the present study.


The Results

The study noted that cannabis-based products are safe "for the treatment of dogs, especially products rich in cannabidiol (CBD), free or with low concentrations of tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]."


The study found that CBD products "potentially promote improved quality of life and reduce pain perception in animals affected by canine osteoarthritis."

The study found that CBD products "potentially promote improved quality of life and reduce pain perception in animals affected by canine osteoarthritis." Like much other pre-clinical research of this type, the study's authors emphasized the need for further research, particularly in the form of clinical trials involving cannabis products that vary in terms of composition, concentration, dose, and consumption avenue.


View the original study.


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