CBCV Research Study

Updated: May 7

The following Higher Learning LV homework sample gives students a basic overview of the minor cannabinoid cannabichromevarin. To learn more about cannabichromevarin and other major and minor phytocannabinoids, subscribe to our Knowledgebase.

The CBCV molecule


Cannabichromevarin, or CBCV, is the varin version of cannabichromene, or CBC. It is categorized as a minor cannabinoid and was first isolated by researchers at the University of Nagasaki in Thailand in 1975. CBCV has been shown to demonstrate anticonvulsant properties, making it of potential value in the treatment of diseases involving convulsions and seizure activity, such as epilepsy.


A 2019 study entitled "Cannabinoid Signaling in the Skin: Therapeutic Potential of the ‘C(ut)annabinoid’ System" that was published in the journal Molecules explored the anti-inflammatory powers of a variety of cannabinoids, including CBCV, with a focus on diseases and conditions of the skin.


"The endocannabinoid system has lately been proven to be an important, multifaceted homeostatic regulator, which influences a wide-variety of physiological processes all over the body" observed the study’s authors.

The study noted the central role in health and wellness played by the endocannabinoid system. "The endocannabinoid system has lately been proven to be an important, multifaceted homeostatic regulator, which influences a wide-variety of physiological processes all over the body" observed the study’s authors.


Reported the researchers, "besides endocannabinoids and [the phytocannabinoid] THC, other phytocannabinoids also deserve attention as potential topical anti-inflammatory agents." The study reported that topical administration of a number of cannabinoids—including CBC, CBCV, CBD, CBDV, THCV, and THC—"was found to exert significant anti-inflammatory effects as revealed by reduced ear swelling."

"Although the best studied functions over the ECS are related to the central nervous system and to immune processes, experimental efforts over the last two decades have unambiguously confirmed that cutaneous [skin-related] cannabinoid signaling is deeply involved in the maintenance of skin homeostasis," wrote the researchers.


The study revealed that deficiencies or dysfunction in the ECS may lead to a variety of skin diseases, including acne, dermatitis, pigmentation disorders, psoriasis, scleroderma, and even various [cancerous] tumors.


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