Cannabichromene (CBC) Research

Updated: May 7

Cannabichromene, or CBC, is a major cannabinoid produced by the hemp plant that was discovered in 1966 by two independent research teams. In the same manner that THC degrades into CBN after exposure to heat or UV light, CBC will, under the same circumstances, degrade into cannabicyclol, or CBL, a non-psychoactive cannabinoid.

The CBC molecule


CBC is the metabolic result of the acidic precursor CBCA (which is, in turn, synthesized by CBGA). CBC is also believed to increase the production or availability of the endocannabinoid anandamide (by acting as a reuptake inhibitor of anandamide).


“Discovered more than 50 years ago, CBC has long been established as one of the most important cannabinoids. However, its potential as medicine is often outshined by the fame of THC and CBD—the former’s fame stemming from years of infamy and the latter’s from more recent marketing,” reported the Journal of Cannabinoid Medicine in 2019.



A 2013 study entitled "The Cannabinoid TRPA1 Agonist Cannabichromene Inhibits Nitric Oxide Production in Macrophages and Ameliorates Murine Colitis" that was published in the British Journal of Pharmacology explored the ability of CBC to treat colitis, a chronic digestive disease.


Reported the study, "the non‐psychotropic cannabinoid cannabichromene is known to...inhibit endocannabinoid inactivation...involved in inflammatory processes," that are known primary mechanisms involved in colitis.

Reported the study, "the non‐psychotropic cannabinoid cannabichromene is known to...inhibit endocannabinoid inactivation...involved in inflammatory processes," that are known primary mechanisms involved in colitis.


The report noted that "CBC exerted protective effects in experimental colitis" and concluded that the cannabinoid possesses two primary therapeutic roles: 1) a limiting of the tissue destruction resulting from autoimmune diseases and 2) specific benefits for IBD patients (based on the data collected regarding the compounds efficacy for colitis).


A 2012 study entitled "Inhibitory Effect of Cannabichromene on Inflammation‐induced Hypermotility" that was published in the British Journal of Pharmacology investigated the ability of CBC to affect intestinal motility (the ability of an organism to move independently).

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The study found CBC to play a role in the reduction of intestinal inflammation in rodent subjects (mice). Concluded the study's authors, "CBC selectively reduces inflammation‐induced hypermotility."


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